It Is What It Is

Now Go Change It.

Phone rings, door chimes,

In comes company!

(Source: stagesandpages, via benantiandthejets)

meduusalammikko:

Fresh dye, new(ish) jewellery (necklace: Earl Foolish) & glitterbrows done in the very flaky “fuck i’m out of lash glue i wonder if brow gel will do” method.

(via anachronistic-nostalgia)

cisharming:

Let me grind this in a little more for you guys.

"cis" (from cisgender) means you identify as the gender you were assigned.

Cis does not mean:

  • You are comfortable with your “body.”
  • "gender you were born with." You’re not born with a gender.
  • "straight." Being cis has nothing to do with your sexuality.

So, can cis people stop altering the definition and spreading misinformation?

(via anachronistic-nostalgia)

amandaonwriting:

Stages of Grief

Subtly removing your bra at work in an attempt to relieve dysphoria

porpentine:

Archetype: Hilarious And Traumatized

aqqindex:

Hiroshi Hara, Hara House, 1974

aqqindex:

Hiroshi Hara, Hara House, 1974

(via benantiandthejets)

Someone bring me a tuna salad sandwich right now please

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

(via veryangrylesbian)

This is a map for the shortest possible road trip that hits all 48 contiguous states.

newsweek:

(via

(via likls)


Fred Armisen, Carrie Brownstein and Natasha Lyonne at Outfest
djackmanson:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

rfc

djackmanson:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

rfc

(via africancheewahwah)

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: the astrological sign for Pluto.

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: the astrological sign for Pluto.

(via anachronistic-nostalgia)

“Queer characters DO NOT and SHOULD NOT have to “make straight people see how normal we are”. I have no interest in characters in literature who look like me but are not for me. Queer characters should first and foremost be for queer people. If straight people get anything out it, then that is a neat perk. I reject the idea of cloaking characters in respectability politics because queer characters are not to blame for queer oppression.

I do not want characters that are written to teach straight people that we are “good people” because the logical extension is to blame queer characters (and queer people) for not being good enough.

—   

Sarah Stumpf at bisexual-books.tumblr.com

(via bisexual-books)

(via nyulgbtq)